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Showing posts from July, 2009

Coming Attractions

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Since August will soon be here, I thought I would share some things that I am working on for Scandalous Women. A review and giveaway of Philippa Gregory's latest historical fiction novel about Elizabeth Woodville An interview with Donna Woolfolk Cross, author of Pope Joan A review of Vanora Bennett's new historical novel about Catharine de Valois. Empress Elisabeth of Austria Evangelist Aimee Semple McPherson And in September, Scandalous Women of the Ancient World, Hapshepsut, Zenobia, Jezebel, among others. So I hope that you will keep reading.

Painted Lady of Passion: The Life of Georgiana, Duchess of Bedford

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Ah, everyone loves a Duke, don't they? Or want to marry one. Romance novels are littered with rich, handsome Dukes, and the heroines who are vying for their hand and noble estate in marriage. A Dukedom is the highest peerage in a long list of titles of the aristocracy, and the most rare. Dukes belong to a long list of rarities, like white truffles, flawless diamonds, and Hermes Kelly bags. There are generally only 26 non-royal dukes at any one time. To be given a dukedom means that one has performed some extraordinary service to the crown (the Duke of Marlborough and his victory at Blenheim, the Duke of Wellington at Waterloo), or one is the bastard son of a King (the Duke of Richmond, the Duke of St. Albans). The last non-royal dukedom was created for the Duke of Wellington in the 19th century. Dukes were, for the most part rich, and they had fabulous estates. Think of Blenheim Palace, Floors Castles in Scotland (where Prince Andrew proposed to Fergie), and Goodwood House (home

Pope Joan Sweepstakes

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Donna Woolfolk Cross, the author of the historical fiction novel, Pope Joan is running an exciting new sweepstakes on her web-site. Join her and her familyto walk the red carpet on the night of the Pope Joan movie premiere! ... Includes two tickets to the movie premiere, plus round trip airfare for two from any location in the continental United States or Canada, and one night hotel accommodation for you to share with your guest. Simply buy a new, Three Rivers Press/Crown Publishing paperback edition of Pope Joan by August 9 and send me the original receipt. In August, she'll pick randomly from the pile of receipts to select someone and their guest to join me at the U.S. movie premiere in the fall (exact date still to be determined). For more information go to her web-site: http://www.popejoan.com/ for information on how to enter.

Murderous Maids: The Scandalous Crimes of the Pepin Sisters

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On a cold February night in 1933, retired lawyer Monsieur Lancelin was supposed to meet his wife and daughter Genevieve for dinner at his brother-in-law's house. When he arrived at his home to pick them up, he found the door bolted from the inside and no lights on, apart from a flickering candle in the attic window. Arriving at his brother-in-law Monsieur Renard's home, he discovered that the two women had not arrived. Returning to his home along with his brother-in-law, they brought along several policemen who forced the window to the parlor. Once inside, the men discovered that the electric lights did not work. With only a flashlight for illumination, the men crept upstairs to find a scene out of a horror film. The two women had been beaten to a pulp, their faces unrecognizable. Their fingernails had been uprooted and most distressing, both women had had their eyes gouged out. Blood stained the carpet till it felt like red moss. When the policemen slowly approached the a

The Last Courtesan: The Life of Pamela Digby Churchill Hayward Harriman

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The life of a courtesan is not an easy one. She must be ‘on’ at all times, she must dress well, be a good conversationalist, spend her time focused on the male in her life not on herself, she must be able to entertain well, serve good food, keep abreast of current events but not be an intellectual. She’s one part geisha and one part siren. A courtesan is not a prostitute, although they both take money from men. A courtesan can have more than one protector, but she must cater equally to them. A courtesan must always keep an eye on the future, for the time when her protectors may leave her. If she’s smart, she’ll have arranged for an annuity to keep her in the style to which she is accustomed, long after she has moved on to other protectors. Is she’s lucky, like Elizabeth Armistead, and La Paiva, she might even get married. Pamela Digby didn’t set out to be a courtesan. The daughter of the 11th Baron Digby, she was born on March 20, 1920. Her life was meant to be one of marriage to anot

And the winner is...........

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The winner of a copy of Susan Holloway Scott's novel The French Mistress is: Kwana Please email me at scandalouswoman@gmail.com with your address so that you can receive your copy!

Scandalous Women welcomes Susan Holloway Scott!

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Scandalous Women is pleased to welcome Susan Holloway Scott, author of The French Mistress today! Remember anyone who leaves a comment will be entered to win a copy of her new book. Here is a brief description to whet your appetite: The daughter of a poor nobleman, Louise leaves the French countryside for the court of King Louis XIV, where she must not only please the tastes of the jaded king, but serve as a spy for France. With few friends, many rivals, and ever-shifting loyalties, Louise learns the perils of her new role. Yet she is too ambitious to be a pawn in the intrigues of others. With the promise of riches, power, and even the love of a king, Louise creates her own destiny in a dance of intrigue between two monarchs—and two countries. Tell us a little about yourself, what is your background, and how long have you been writing before you were published? I graduated from Brown University with a degree in art history. It was at Brown that I learned the magic of working with